Dupuytren’s

Dupuytren’s and Frozen shoulder
By: Charles Eaton
Nov 11, 2009

About one in six patients with frozen shoulder will also have Dupuytren’s disease and vice versa. Frozen shoulder has been called “Dupuytren’s of the shoulder”: the abnormal tissues are quite similar. However, they are different in other respects – for example, Dupuytren’s commonly recurs after surgical treatment, but frozen shoulder does not. This study demonstrates […]

Read more ›
Vascular cause of Dupuytren’s?
On: Nov 10, 2009
By: Charles Eaton

Diabetes, hypertension, stiff finger joints and Dupuytren’s: This study uses retinopathy as an index of vascular disease and suggests that small vessel disease, rather than the effect of blood sugar on collagen, is the link between diabetes and Dupuytren’s: http://www.dupuytrenfoundation.org/DupPDFs/1986_Larkin_1218.pdf

Read more ›
A landmark advance in understanding Dupuytren’s
On: Nov 8, 2009
By: Charles Eaton

Two methods of investigating Dupuytren’s have been used: Demographic – family studies, associations with medications, activities, other diseases; and Biological – tissue analysis. The big biologic breakthrough came in 1972 when Gabbiani and others published two articles back to back findings on the biology of myofibroblasts:http://www.dupuytrenfoundation.org/DupPDFs/1972_Gabbiani_719.pdfand the role of myofibroblasts in Dupuytren’s Disease:http://www.dupuytrenfoundation.org/DupPDFs/1972_Gabbiani_1115.pdfWe need more […]

Read more ›
Smooth Muscle Actin in Dupuytren’s Contracture
On: Nov 7, 2009
By: Charles Eaton

The palmar fascia in Duputren’s contracture does not contract like a muscle: it’s more like the effect of an army of tiny rachets. Adjacent parallel strands of collagen are grabbed by myofibroblasts, which then shorten (“crimp”) lengthwise, pulling the strands to overlap more and more, and then gluing these strands together with crosslinks. Crimp, lock, […]

Read more ›
Dupuytren’s Foundation and Scripps Research
On: Apr 5, 2009
By: Charles Eaton

The Dupuytren’s Foundation http://www.dupuytrenfoundation.org has officially partnered with Scripps research to establish a DNA bank of tissues affected by Dupuytren’s disease. This will be available to researchers interested in studying Dupuytren DNA. So far, 20 samples have been collected. If the gene is identified, progress toward acure will be greatly streamlined. Very exciting. Interested in […]

Read more ›