Dupuytren’s Contracture

Machines to Stretch Dupuytren’s Cords
Dec 28, 2009

There is not yet a perfect solution for PIP contractures from Dupuytren’s Disease, or for PIP contractures in general. One approach has been to use temporary skeletal fixation devices to slowly lengthen Dupuytren’s cords and scar tissue. The collagen bundles in Dupuytren’s cords don’t actually stretch: they remodel, disconnecting crosslinks between adjacent strands, sliding adjacent […]

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Dupuytren’s, epilepsy, barbiturates and genes: a chemical love …triangle.
On: Dec 26, 2009
By: Charles Eaton

Dupuytren’s has been associated with epilepsy. The type or cause of epilepsy doesn’t seem to matter. What does matter is the specific medication phenobarbitone. Dupuytren’s was not common in epileptics prior to the common use of this medicine, but is very common in people on long term treatment with it: Dupuytren’s will be found in […]

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How the FDA sees Collagenase for Dupuytren’s
On: Dec 23, 2009
By: Charles Eaton

Why is it taking so long for collagenase injection treatment to be available to treat Dupuytren’s? Trials have been ongoing for over 10 years. The answer: collagenase is an extremely potent substance, and the FDA has required very detailed proof not only that it works, but that it is safe, and that it has something […]

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Abstracts can be misleading
On: Dec 22, 2009
By: Charles Eaton

Unlike proximal interphalangeal joint contractures from Dupuytren’s, metacarpophalangeal joint contractures usually respond so well to fasciectomy or fasciotomy that joint capsule or ligament release is generally not a consideration. Because of this, I was intrigued by the title of this report: a series of patients treated with dermofasciectomy and MP joint release – it’s an […]

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Myofibroblast Biology
On: Dec 21, 2009
By: Charles Eaton

Myofibroblast biology is at the heart not only of Dupuytren’s, but of other diseases not related to Dupuytren’s. Myofibroblasts are major players in pulmonary fibrosis, cirrhosis, renal fibrosis and arteriosclerosis. Studies of myofibroblast biology in these conditions may shed light on potential new treatment strategies for Dupuytren’s. Gains in the management of any one myofibroblast […]

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What’s old is new in Dupuytren’s
On: Dec 11, 2009
By: Charles Eaton

Larsen’s insightful study and review of the demographics and microscopic anatomy of Dupuytren’s disease is over 50 years old, but reads like a recent publication. The author describes and ponders the significance of topics which were well known at the time: perivascular inflammation adjacent to but not within the affected areas; iron pigment in the […]

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