Dupuytren’s

Rock Climbing and Dupuytren’s – an interesting analysis
By: Charles Eaton
Dec 24, 2009

Dupuytren’s is an inherited systemic disorder of either the threshold or the feedback inhibition of the biology of scar formation, contracture and maturation. It is not spontaneous, but triggered in specific areas having the common characteristic of being subjected to repeated high shearing or stretching forces: palmar fascia, plantar fascia, shoulder capsule, tunica albuginea of […]

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Pregnancy, Dupuytren’s and Relaxin
On: Dec 20, 2009
By: Charles Eaton

Relaxin is a natural hormone which does many things and normally increases during pregnancy. It has been shown to have a range of antifibrotic actions: it inhibits collagen synthesis, increases collagenase activity, inhibits the profibrotic factors TGFß and Interleukin1-ß, and prevents fibroblast differentiation into myofibroblasts. How does it work? Is Dupuytren’s related to low relaxin […]

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Fasciotomy versus fasciectomy for Dupuytren’s
On: Dec 17, 2009
By: Charles Eaton

Fasciectomy and fasciotomy were compared in this study with some interesting observations. Initially after procedure, fasciotomy was better than fasciectomy in straightening fingers, but this advantage was lost over time as fasciotomy had earlier recurrences than fasciectomy. Fasciectomy had better results at correcting PIP joint contractures, both early and late. Recovery time was longer and […]

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Partial Fasciectomy for Dupuytren’s
On: Dec 16, 2009
By: Charles Eaton

Dupuytren’s patients need two things: first, a way to prevent disease progression and recurrence; second, the simplest, safest way to straighten fingers bent by Dupuytren’s. While working and waiting on the first, there are choices for the second. One of these is limited or partial fasciectomy, which has the advantage of quick recovery and low […]

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TGF-ß2 and Dupuytren’s
On: Dec 15, 2009
By: Charles Eaton

What if Dupuytren’s is due to slightly abnormal levels of a normal hormone, protein or other molecule in the system? If so, one of the most likely suspects would be Transforming Growth Factor Beta Two: TGF-ß2. This protein is part of the autocrine system (a chemical instant messaging system which lets individual cells communicate with […]

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Deformity, aggressiveness and severity of Dupuytren’s
On: Dec 14, 2009
By: Charles Eaton

When is the most effective time to treat Dupuytren’s and what is the best treatment? These are not easy questions. Dupuytren’s responds differently and recurs differently in different people: starting with the same deformity (how bent the fingers are), people who do worse are described as having “aggressive” Dupuytren’s. Severity is a combination of the […]

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Monkey model for Dupuytren’s
On: Dec 12, 2009
By: Charles Eaton

An experimental monkey model of Dupuytren’s Disease was performed to confirm or refute the microtrauma hypothesis of Dupuytren’s. The outcome: the reaction to rupture of the palmar fascia produced lesions identical to those of early Dupuytren’s, although did not lead to contractures during the period of study. The conclusion was that trauma is not the […]

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Nice Overview of Dupuytren Disease
On: Dec 10, 2009
By: Charles Eaton

Time to pause and look at the big picture. Here is a balanced overview of the history, biology, etiology and epidemiology of Dupuytren Disease: https://dupuytrens.org/DupPDFs/2003_Thurston.pdf

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The potential of cryotherapy and Dupuytren’s
On: Dec 9, 2009
By: Charles Eaton

Myofibroblasts are part of the normal tissue repair response to almost all injuries: cut, crush, burn, chemical injury, infectious gangrene, and others – with one exception: freeze injury. Freeze burns don’t contract, possibly because only in freeze injury, the original collagen matrix scaffold is preserved, which may inhibit myofibroblast formation: http://www.dupuytrenfoundation.org/DupPDFs/1984_Ehrlich.pdf. This makes cryotherapy a […]

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